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Zoom Cosimo e Nicole—Italian Film Festival ‘14 Minneapolis, MN

Cosimo e Nicole—Italian Film Festival ‘14 Minneapolis, MN

03.25.14 5
Zoom 
this is miyazaki rain, which means that every frame was hand-drawn

^THIS is not done by Miyazaki, this is done by Makoto Shinkai!

this is miyazaki rain, which means that every frame was hand-drawn

^THIS is not done by Miyazaki, this is done by Makoto Shinkai!

03.25.14 669238

Seven (1995)

Long is the way, and hard, that out of hell leads up to light.

01.20.14 353
Miscellaneous thoughts on Her.

I think that so many parts of me wanted to turn this movie off, to cringe, to look away, or just to scream at the screen for all the things that were happening that I felt were artificial, wrong, or inevitably bound to fail. I doubt that I am alone in these sentiments. However, if I’m honest with myself, there were so many parts that I also envied about the relationship between Theodore and Samantha. It may have been nontraditional, what they shared together, in the most accurate understanding of that word, but it was also an enlightening experience.

I confess that the part that rubbed me wrong the most was just all the scenes that involved this coming to terms with the physical and the non-physical, what is present and what is distant. Even Theodore’s “real” relationships seemed to lack in so many ways that it only made sense that his mind would want to grab onto something so refreshing and new as his time spent with Samantha. I must also confess that it is this progression that we call modernity that I place most of blame for all these emerging complex emotions and seemingly insurmountable intricacies of daily life. So why did it bother me so much that a man felt loved, and indeed gave love to something that, by our human understanding, is not real? I suppose it is because for so many thousands of years those that came before us lived their lives without such an option, so it strikes most people as odd when such a bond develops and does so in a way that resembles a human relationship.

But ask yourself this question: if that bond, that relationship, however strange we may perceive it to be, brings about a new outlook on life and of love, then how does it differ from any of the other such bonds we have over the course of our lives? Whether with other people, or with our pets, or with our very hobbies and passions— we find ourselves inexplicably attached and at the same time sharing in some kind of reciprocation. It is not just between our fellow human beings that we can learn to live anew, it is also among all things of the world even something as mundane and technological manufactured as a computer. Perhaps, given that it is of mankind’s creation and therefore possesses some of our flaws as well as many of our strengths, that it makes so most sense that such a story should develop and resonate so deeply and so widespread. Sometimes we all just need a lending ear, a soothing voice, and some kind words to steer us out of our melancholy and dissatisfaction and back into a place where we can live our lives to their absolute fullest.

Some people may decry the relationship that Jonze created and brought to life as a falsity and a perversion of what human emotion should truly be, but truthfully no greater falsity or perversion of emotion exists than to forsake it when it presents itself so honestly in the hopes of being experienced. This film was nowhere near the greatest story of love and intimacy ever filmed, but nor did it need to be, it just wanted to nudge us in the right direction, with the hopes that we find some semblance of it for ourselves.

01.20.14 0
Sleeping Beauty (1959)

One of the original greats in animated films.

01.19.14 8697

taktophoto:

Photos from Popular Movie Scenes Held Up in Front of Real World Location

01.19.14 610017
Zoom The Grand Budapest HotelPoster

The Grand Budapest HotelPoster

10.15.13 2146

 

Cloud Atlas | “What is an ocean but a multitude of drops?”

06.17.13 446
Toronto Film Festival: Partying With Ben Affleck and Reactions to 'The Master,' 'Cloud Atlas' and More

The two big-budget, big-expectation tentpoles, “Cloud Atlas” and “The Master” had audiences waiting for hours and industry speculating.

09.10.12 0
Zoom bbook:

And like the best John Hughes films, Perks treats its characters appropriately. They are not annoyingly wise beyond their years, nor are they looked down upon. “I set out to respect what young people go through right at eye level,” Chbosky says. The subtle period setting was also deliberate. “I wanted the movie to feel as absolutely timeless as possible. One of my favorite movies is Dead Poets Society. It takes place in 1959, but it could have taken place last year.”
What is most surprising, however, is the treatment of Sam and Patrick, who under the control of any other auteur could have turned into stock Manic Pixie Dream Girl / Manic Pixie Dream Gay characters whose only role in the film is to guide young Charlie (played by Logan Lerman) into emotional maturity via their own quirks and precociousness. With Emma Watson and Ezra Miller in those roles, however, Sam and Patrick offer up more than the pretty looks of the actors portraying them. Watson’s Sam is glorious and tragic, already full of regret at eighteen and striving to overcome the mistakes of her very recent past. In Patrick, Miller delivers a surprising confidence and a recognizable vulnerability, a combination not seen in most gay male characters, much less those still in high school.
Stephen Chbosky Brings His Iconic The Perks of Being a Wallflower to the Big Screen

bbook:

And like the best John Hughes films, Perks treats its characters appropriately. They are not annoyingly wise beyond their years, nor are they looked down upon. “I set out to respect what young people go through right at eye level,” Chbosky says. The subtle period setting was also deliberate. “I wanted the movie to feel as absolutely timeless as possible. One of my favorite movies is Dead Poets Society. It takes place in 1959, but it could have taken place last year.”

What is most surprising, however, is the treatment of Sam and Patrick, who under the control of any other auteur could have turned into stock Manic Pixie Dream Girl / Manic Pixie Dream Gay characters whose only role in the film is to guide young Charlie (played by Logan Lerman) into emotional maturity via their own quirks and precociousness. With Emma Watson and Ezra Miller in those roles, however, Sam and Patrick offer up more than the pretty looks of the actors portraying them. Watson’s Sam is glorious and tragic, already full of regret at eighteen and striving to overcome the mistakes of her very recent past. In Patrick, Miller delivers a surprising confidence and a recognizable vulnerability, a combination not seen in most gay male characters, much less those still in high school.

Stephen Chbosky Brings His Iconic The Perks of Being a Wallflower to the Big Screen

09.10.12 363

"Benjamin… We are meant to lose the people we love… How else would we know how important they are to us?"

09.10.12 7462
Zoom salesonfilm:


“I am eye. I am a mechanical eye. I, a machine, am showing you a world, the likes of which only I can see.”— Dziga Vertov (1896 - 1954)


Left to right, top to bottom:
Man With a Movie Camera (Dziga Vertov, 1929)Un Chien Andalou (Luis Buñuel, 1929)Meshes of the Afternoon (Maya Deren/Alexander Hammid, 1943)The Spiral Staircase (Robert Siodmak, 1945)Vertigo (Alfred Hitchcock, 1958)Psycho (Alfred Hitchcock, 1960)Peeping Tom (Michael Powell, 1960)Alphaville (Jean-Luc Godard, 1965)Repulsion (Roman Polanski, 1965)2001: A Space Odyssey (Stanley Kubrick, 1968)McCabe & Mrs. Miller (Robert Altman, 1971)Deep Red (Dario Argento, 1975)Rubens (Roland Verhavert, 1977)Blade Runner (Ridley Scott, 1982)Requiem for a Dream (Darren Aronofsky, 2000)Donnie Darko (Richard Kelly, 2001)Gangs of New York (Martin Scorsese, 2002)The Diving Bell and the Butterfly (Julian Schnabel, 2007) 
(via David Liu)

salesonfilm:

“I am eye. I am a mechanical eye. I, a machine, am showing you a world, the likes of which only I can see.”— Dziga Vertov (1896 - 1954)

Left to right, top to bottom:

Man With a Movie Camera (Dziga Vertov, 1929)
Un Chien Andalou (Luis Buñuel, 1929)
Meshes of the Afternoon (Maya Deren/Alexander Hammid, 1943)
The Spiral Staircase (Robert Siodmak, 1945)
Vertigo (Alfred Hitchcock, 1958)
Psycho (Alfred Hitchcock, 1960)
Peeping Tom (Michael Powell, 1960)
Alphaville (Jean-Luc Godard, 1965)
Repulsion (Roman Polanski, 1965)
2001: A Space Odyssey (Stanley Kubrick, 1968)
McCabe & Mrs. Miller (Robert Altman, 1971)
Deep Red (Dario Argento, 1975)
Rubens (Roland Verhavert, 1977)
Blade Runner (Ridley Scott, 1982)
Requiem for a Dream (Darren Aronofsky, 2000)
Donnie Darko (Richard Kelly, 2001)
Gangs of New York (Martin Scorsese, 2002)
The Diving Bell and the Butterfly (Julian Schnabel, 2007) 

(via David Liu)

08.11.12 604
Zoom Hitchcock on the set of Pyscho with Anthony Perkins (1960)

Hitchcock on the set of Pyscho with Anthony Perkins (1960)

08.10.12 161
Zoom singingonpavements:

Sometimes when we lose ourselves in fear and despair, in routine and constancy, in hopelessness and tragedy, we can thank God for Bavarian sugar cookies.

Stranger than Fiction (Marc Forster;2006)

singingonpavements:

Sometimes when we lose ourselves in fear and despair, in routine and constancy, in hopelessness and tragedy, we can thank God for Bavarian sugar cookies.

Stranger than Fiction (Marc Forster;2006)

08.10.12 41

I decided to stop pitying myself. Other than my eye, two things aren’t paralyzed, my imagination and my memory. 

The Diving Bell and the Butterfly (Julian Schnabel;2007)

08.10.12 593